Ankrin Therapeutics has been awarded 2.4 million DKK from Innovation Fund Denmark's 'Innobooster' program

The Grant will support Ankrin’s discovery programs targeting so-called homologous recombination (HR), a critical DNA damage response (DDR) mechanism in cancer cells. Ankrin’s novel concept provides a new approach to inhibit HR with potential to treat a broad spectrum of cancers.

Ankrin co-founder Anja Groth receives prestigious research prize from Queen Margrethe II and the Royal Danish Academy

The Royal Danish Academy has awarded this year’s Queen Margrethe II’s Science Prize to Ankrin’s co-founder and CSO Anja Groth for her outstanding research in molecular cell biology and epigenetics. The pretigious prize of 100,000 DKK will be awarded by HM Queen Margrethe II herself in a ceremony at the Academy later this autumn for the fifth consecutive year. Since 2015, Queen Margrethe II’s Science Prize has been awarded to excellent Danish researchers under the age of 50 working in all scientific fields represented at the Academy.

» Read more at Science Report

Ankrin Therapeutics enters BioInnovation Institute's Creation House programme and receives 10 M DKK funding

Ankrin Therapeutics has just become the fifth start-up to be accepted at BioInnovation Institute’s Creation House programme receiving a 10 M DKK convertible loan funding. The funding will be used to identify compounds disrupting essential protein-protein interactions involved in homologous recombination and to develop first-in-class anticancer drugs.

» Read more at BII

Ankrin Therapeutics featured in Danish newspaper Berlingske

The Danish newspaper Berlingske has published an article about the blooming of Life Sciences start-ups in Denmark during the year 2018 featuring an interview with Ankrin Therapeutics' founder and CSO Professor Anja Groth.

» Read complete interview (in Danish)

New study lead by Prof. Anja Groth, CSO and co-founder of Ankrin Therapeutics, has identified one of the main mechanisms behind the repair of serious damage to the human DNA

The work, published in Nature Cell Biology, focuses on BARD1, a ‘scanner’ inside the cells that decides whether or not so-called error-free DNA repair, which protects against cancer, is launched.

» Read more at SCIENMAG

» Read full scientific article